Treatment For Bursitis Of The Foot

Overview

Bursitis is the inflammation of a bursa within the body. A bursa is a fluid-filled sac that cushions some of the major joints, allowing bones, gliding muscles, and tissues to exist together without harming each other. It aids in reducing the friction between bones and the soft tissues above it. Though there are bursae all over the body, the main ones are located in the knee, elbow, shoulder, hip, and heel. These are also the ones that are the most often injured. Still, however, when you hear the word ?bursitis?, the person is usually referring to their shoulder, but it could also refer to any of the preceding areas–such as the second most common one, the hip.

Causes

Pain at the posterior heel or ankle is most commonly caused by pathology at either the posterior calcaneus (at the calcaneal insertion site of the Achilles tendon) or at its associated bursae. Two bursae are located just superior to the insertion of the Achilles (calcaneal) tendon. Anterior or deep to the tendon is the retrocalcaneal (subtendinous) bursa, which is located between the Achilles tendon and the calcaneus. Posterior or superficial to the Achilles tendon is the subcutaneous calcaneal bursa, also called the Achilles bursa. This bursa is located between the skin and posterior aspect of the distal Achilles tendon. Inflammation of either or both of these bursa can cause pain at the posterior heel and ankle region.

Symptoms

Your feet are extremely resilient and are designed to stand up to the pressures of day-to-day living. In some cases, though, foot structures may break down when subjected to chronic stress associated with prolonged periods of weight-bearing activity on concrete, asphalt, or other hard surfaces (especially when your footwear does not allow for appropriate weight distribution). Foot problems, including infracalcaneal bursitis, are often exacerbated by poorly designed footwear, and pressure, impact, and shear forces can damage your feet over time. Bursal sacs are intended to minimize this damage, but sometimes the bursa itself becomes inflamed.

Diagnosis

Bursitis is usually diagnosed after a careful physical examination and a full review of your medical history. If you garden and spend a lot of time on your knees, or if you have rheumatoid arthritis, tell your doctor, this information can be very helpful. During the physical exam, he or she will press on different spots around the joint that hurts. The goal is to locate the specific bursa that is causing the problem. The doctor will also test your range of motion in the affected joint. Other tests usually aren?t required to diagnose bursitis, but your doctor may suggest an MRI, X-ray or ultrasound to rule out other potential causes of pain.

Non Surgical Treatment

All types of bursitis often can be successfully managed non-surgically, and possible treatments include use of ice packs or compressive dressings, activity modification that may reduce stress or irritation, administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or antibiotics, corticosteroid injections (knee and elbow), stretching exercises, and/or change of footwear (heel). Surgery may be required in patients whose symptoms remain following these treatments and in certain situations when infection is involved.

Surgical Treatment

Surgery to remove the damaged bursa may be performed in extreme cases. If the bursitis is caused by an infection, then additional treatment is needed. Septic bursitis is caused by the presence of a pus-forming organism, usually staphylococcus aureus. This is confirmed by examining a sample of the fluid in the bursa and requires treatment with antibiotics taken by mouth, injected into a muscle or into a vein (intravenously). The bursa will also need to be drained by needle two or three times over the first week of treatment. When a patient has such a serious infection, there may be underlying causes. There could be undiscovered diabetes, or an inefficient immune system caused by human immunodeficiency virus infection (HIV).